Czech Beer Blog

News from Czech beer scene plus some more stuff. Na zdravi!

Beer World Cup – Round of 16 — July 10, 2014

Beer World Cup – Round of 16

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The knockout stage is here! I let some of my frieds vote and they had to choose two beers from every group which they liked to taste it the most. I made a tables then and there are the results! For Round of 16 I will use only names of states and kinds of beer so you can get a perspective what styles are interesting for tasting.

Mexico (Stout) – Chile (Oatmeal Stout)
Japan (Espresso Stout) – Italy (Saison)
Ecuador (IPA) – Bosnia & Herzegovina (Keller/Landbier)
Portugal (Pilsener) – Russia (Porter)
Brasil (Rauchbier) – Spain (Imperial IPA)
Colombia (IPA) – England (Oatmeal Stout)
France (Bierre de Garde) – Argentina (IPA)
USA (APA) – South Korea (IPA)

Suprisingly Germany, Netherlands and Belgium didn´t make it to the Round of 16. The reasons are probably that I have chosen not so attractive brands or that my voters were in mood for something more exotic and in fact they were a bit suprised that you can find some very interesting beers in South America and Asia.

It´s not a suprise that no African beer made the playoffs.

32 teams in Brazil for World Cup 2014 – 32 great beers from every country participating! (Group D) — June 12, 2014

32 teams in Brazil for World Cup 2014 – 32 great beers from every country participating! (Group D)

Well, let´s play a little game. World Cup 2014 starts in a few days and billions of people around the world will be watching. And many of them will enjoy a good beer and I have decided to give them tips for at least onde good or at least decent brew from every country playing there. Some will be easy, some will be pretty challenging. So there we go!

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Group D

Uruguay – Davok Shannon Dunkel – Montevideo – Cerveza: Negra Estilo: Cerveza Ale Oscura con Trigo. Receta personalizada para The Shannon Irish Pub Cont.Alc: 6,0 % Apariencia: Color marrón oscuro. Espuma espesa color canela con buena retención. Aroma: Aroma intenso a maltas tostadas con muy bajo aroma a lúpulo. Notas a pan se confunden con los ésteres frutados característicos de las cervezas que utilizan levaduras para mostos elaborados con trigo. Cuerpo y Sabor: Cuerpo medio-pleno con elevada carbonatación. Es una cerveza compleja, densa y de bajo amargor. “Tap at The Shannon, Montevideo. Dark brown color, good off-white head. Aroma is coffeish, roasted malty. Medium-bodied. Toasted, coffeish and a bit sweet. Nicely balanced and the best Uru beer so far.” – Tbone

Costa Rica – Costa Rica´s Segua Red Ale – Cartago – Irish Ale – La Segua Red Ale will lure you in with its full hop nose and surprise you with it’s full body and nice caramel color. Then she will finish you off with a monstrous crisp, hoppy finish. The only beer of its kind in Costa Rica, this beer is sure to please the taste buds of the most discerning Craft Beer drinker. We challenge you to bring La Segua home and enjoy her to the bitter end! “Keg at Hotel Belmar, Monteverde. Clear amber, small head. Bready nose with roses and grapefruit. Mid dry with light-medium body and clean, rounded mouthfeel. Crystal malt and toast, slight citrus hops. Mid bittet finish. Nicely balanced.” – omhper

England – Samuel Smiths Oatmeal Stout – Tadcaster – Originally a drink for lactating mothers, oatmeal stout was described as nutritional on early labels. Oats are in the same family as barley, and a small addition yields great flavor. Popular in the late 1800’s, the last oatmeal stout was brewed before the First World War until Samuel Smith reintroduced this style in 1980. “Bottle. Pours a dark brown almost black color with a longlasting creamy tan head. Fruity roasted malty chocolate aroma with some hints of caramel. Roasted malty chocolate and dark fruit flavor. Smooth malty chocolate finish with a slightly bitter aftertaste.” – anders37

Italy – Birra del Borgo Duchessic – Borgorose – Saison – Birra del Borgo saison blended with Cantillon Lambic. “Bottle 75 cl. RBESG Rome 2010. Pours a cloudy and opaque golden with an off-white head leaving some laces. Dry lambicish nose – a little barnyard. Rather light in body, again dry lambic accents – hardly any residual sugars here. Sulphurous but not really sour though. Ends very dry. Quite interesting. 020610” – papsoe

5+1 Monday Beer Readings (10) — June 2, 2014

5+1 Monday Beer Readings (10)

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Prof. says beard, beer got him canned at CSU
http://www.postandcourier.com/
A professor at Charleston Southern University is claiming he was fired over his moustached likeness adorning a Holy City beer can. Paul Roof, founder of the Holy City Beard & Moustache Society, says in a Facebook post Tuesday that he was let go from his position as an associate professor of sociology at the Christian liberal arts college in North Charleston. The photo of Paul Roof taken by Greg Anderson at the 2013 Beard and Moustache National Championships. The photo of Paul Roof taken by Greg Anderson at the 2013 Beard and Moustache National Championships. On the label of Holy City’s Chucktown Follicle Brown, Roof sports a curling, coiffured beard and white cowboy hat.

How England’s Yeast Vault Saved a Brewery After a Disastrous Flood
http://gizmodo.com/
A commercial brewery is really a factory. Raw ingredients like grain and water go in one end, flow through pipes and tanks, and beer comes out the other side. But you could gut and replace all those pipes and tanks, switch from one grain supplier to another, swap out the walls and the controllers, and the same beer would still flow from the taps, metaphorically speaking. The one thing the brewery cannot afford to lose is a finicky microbe that is the not-so-secret power behind the whole show. If you are a brewer and you plan to make a product people like, and keep making it the same way, you must maintain your yeast. The same goes for wineries, and even for distilleries — before you can distill a spirit, you have to have something fermented to start with. If you lose your yeast, you’re dead.

100 American Craft Beers Every Beer-Lover Should Drink
http://www.pastemagazine.com/
There are some things in life that people simply have to experience first hand. Riding a roller coaster. Catching a wild brook trout. Running a mile for time. Dating someone out of your league…this is what life is all about. If you’re a baseball fan, you have to see a game at Wrigley Field. If you eat food, you have to try the spicy fried chicken at Gus’s Fried Chicken in Memphis. You just have to. You haven’t lived until you’ve experienced that chicken. Likewise, if you’re a beer drinker, there are certain beers you have to drink. At least once. We’ve thought long and hard about what those quintessential beers are—the ones that everyone should try—and we’ve come up with a hearty list of 100 that define the American craft beer scene. Some of these beers would be considered the best beers in the country, if not the world. Others can hold their own, but earned a spot on this list because of the role they played in the craft beer movement. Is this a definitive list of beers everyone should try? Dear Lord, no. If you truly love beer, you should try them all. Even the bad ones. At least once. But this list will get you started.

Would You Pay $1,000 Once to Get Free Beer for Life?
http://www.citylab.com/
There is a price tag for unlimited beer for the rest of your life. It’s $1,000. In reality, the cost for that much beer is a lot more. But for a few dozen people, free beer for life is their reward for investing in a small restaurant called Northbound Smokehouse & Brewpub in a quiet southern corner of Minneapolis. Amy Johnson and her two business partners needed to raise $220,000 to secure a bank loan and fulfill their dream of opening a restaurant that served beer brewed right there at the pub. They went to investors who offered to give heavily for a voting share in the restaurant. But since the potential investors had no experience in the restaurant industry, the owners backed away.

THE SEASON OF SAISON [BEER STYLES]
http://drinkcraftbeer.com/
A few years ago, in 2012, Drink Craft Beer highlighted several Saisons in a piece called “For the Love of Saison.” Back then, American craft brewers making Saison was a somewhat new phenomenon. Today there are breweries throughout America that are trying their hands at brewing a Saison, each with a unique take on the classic Belgian style. I took the time to collect and sample some Saisons from across New England, and I am happy to report that the style is still going strong. (Editor’s Note: Everything seen here is available in Massachusetts, and several of them are available throughought New England.)

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Year of Beer Paintings – Day 150
http://realartisbetter.wordpress.com/
Today is a milestone in my Year of Beer Paintings project — Day 150! I’ve been painting a different beer every day in 2014, and haven’t missed a single day! Check out my oil paintings and prints if you are so inclined. Cheers!

5+1 Monday Beer Readings (8) — May 19, 2014

5+1 Monday Beer Readings (8)

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Doing my bit for the Surrey hop-growing industry
http://zythophile.wordpress.com/

I’ve been invited on plenty of brewery visits over the years, but never before has the invite come with the request: “Please bring wellies and a spade.” This, however, was a field trip in a considerably more literal sense than normal: to the two and a half-acre field right opposite the Hogs Back brewery in Tongham, just outside Farnham in Surrey, to witness – and take part in – a historic event: the first planting of the Farnham White Bine hop variety in its native soil since the last bines were grubbed up 85 years ago. This is not just, however, a footnote in Farming Today magazine: this is, according to Hogs Back’s chairman, Rupert Thompson, an important step towards increasing the “localism” aspect of the brewery’s products. Once the new hop ground (the proper Surrey name for what elsewhere are called hop gardens or hop yards) are producing a healthy crop, those hops can then be used to flavour the beer being brewed just yards away: Surrey’s own hop variety, grown in Surrey, to produce Surrey beers.

 

How India pale ale conquered the world
http://www.economist.com/

INDIA pale ale (IPA) had a good claim to be the first global beer, before lager took a grip on the world’s tipplers. Now IPA, an amber, hop-laden brew, high in alcohol, is regaining its global footprint. Arguments rage about the origins and history of IPA. Britain’s territories on the Indian subcontinent were generally too hot for brewing. So a couple of hundred years ago, to keep army officers and officials of the East India Company away from the fearsome local firewater, beer was exported from Britain to take its place. Whether a beer already existed that had the characteristics of IPA or whether it was developed for the purpose is a matter of heated debate among beer historians. What is clear is that hops, which act as a preservative as well as a flavouring, combined with a hefty dose of alcohol for added robustness, ensured that the beer survived the long sea journey to India. Indeed, the months jiggling in a barrel onboard seemed only to improve the flavour. The style caught on at home, as the brew seeped onto the domestic market.

 

How We Brewed the Beer of the Future
http://gizmodo.com/

It’s time for the final chapter in the story of our collaboration with Sixpoint to make Hop Tech 431, the beer of the future. First, we found an experimental hop and we designed a brand-new recipe, then we trained a swarm of autonomous robots to do the brewing. Just kidding. Instead, we brewed it the old-school way—by hand—on Sixpoint’s 15-barrel system in Red Hook, Brooklyn. Gizmodo joined brewers Danny Bruckert and Keir Hamilton to take our turn with the mash paddle (which subsequently broke, in a—we claim—entirely unrelated incident).

 

Stone Brewery Evacuated Due To Wild Fires In San Marcos, CA
http://mybeerbuzz.blogspot.cz/

Photos and tweets courtesy of Stone: We are officially evacuating our home base. Thanks to everyone for expressing their care and concern. This is the view from the roof of our brewery. Wishing best to friends throughout San Diego County!!! #sanmarcosfire

 

Reports of the Craft Beer Bubble Have Been Greatly Exaggerated
http://www.inebriateinquirer.com/

If you’ve spent any time talking to people in the craft beer community, you’ve heard them bring the subject around to an ominous prospect for the industry: a bubble. The argument goes that an industry with such short pedigree and such rapid growth will invariably collapse under the weight of its own success, resulting in bankrupt businesses, lost jobs, and empty glassware. But is the bubble real? Or is it just a specter brought about by nervous beer-drinkers? First, let’s take a look at the facts.

 

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10 FUNNIEST BREWERY ‘UNDER 21′ REDIRECT PAGES
http://guyism.com/

The idiots that be determined that people under 21 years old shouldn’t be allowed to look at brewery websites because they might get secondhand wasted. Many breweries just have a “tough shit” pop up or redirect to Google. But some take it upon themselves to ease the defeat with entertainment.

Pivovar Podlesí – Skotský Ale — April 29, 2014
A Beginner’s Guide to British Beer Styles — March 21, 2014

A Beginner’s Guide to British Beer Styles

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A few days ago I added a link to seriouseats´ article about Belgian beer styles. Today I continue with a new one – this time about British beer styles. British beer is very famous and the tradition is very old. I love their styles because I prefer bitter brews and British beer is synonymous for bitter. So what else is made there?

seriouseats.com

“When I began to plan this series of beginner’s guides to the world’s most famous beer styles, I was pumped. I would get to shine light on the underappreciated lagers of Germany and reignite passions for the Belgian beers that gave so many of us beer geeks our start. I’d get to draw attention to the style-bending innovation occurring in the United States [coming soon]! But along with that, I’d have to cover British beers. Less pumped all of a sudden.

It’s not that I don’t like British beer. I do! There are few things better to me than a couple of rounds of well-made ESB or mild in a cozy pub.

But writing about British beer styles is complicated. Beer culture in Britain is as much about the culture of cask ale and the pub as it is the beer itself. In the Oxford Companion to Beer, Pete Brown describes the scene as “something that re

In other words—just discussing beer styles sells British beer short. These beer styles also have a history of dramatic change over time such that it’s difficult to establish what a “traditional” example of any style looks like.fuses to be bottled, standardized, or easily replicated.”

Then there are the myths and half-truths. Think that IPA was invented to sustain British troops in India? Think milds have always been super low in alcohol? Think porter was invented by a dude named Ralph Harwood? These often-told fanciful stories are more myth than history.

So let’s get into it. Curious about the beer styles of Britain? Here’s an introduction.”

A Beginner’s Guide to British Beer Styles