Czech Beer Blog

News from Czech beer scene plus some more stuff. Na zdravi!

32 teams in Brazil for World Cup 2014 – 32 great beers from every country participating! (Group H) — June 17, 2014

32 teams in Brazil for World Cup 2014 – 32 great beers from every country participating! (Group H)

Well, let´s play a little game. World Cup 2014 starts in a few days and billions of people around the world will be watching. And many of them will enjoy a good beer and I have decided to give them tips for at least onde good or at least decent brew from every country playing there. Some will be easy, some will be pretty challenging. So there we go!

GroupH

Group H

Belgium – Rochefort Trappistes 10 – Rochefort – Abt/Quadrupel – The top product from the Rochefort Trappist brewery. Dark color, full and very impressive taste. Strong plum, raisin, and black currant palate, with ascending notes of vinousness and other complexities. “33 cL bottle. Pours dark brown with a diminished off-white head. Aroma is discretely spiced, mild caramel malt and subdued yeast note. Solid carbonation. Flavour is smooth, subdued fruity, slight yeasty. Very very very complex yet elegant (acetyl, raisins, malt, slight roasted, plum, winous, caramel, smooth chocolate and nicely bitter), not overly done, just PERFECTLY balanced! Emphasise has to be put on PERFECT aroma, flavour and palate. Nice lingering finish. Sharp edge in the far finish. It just falls slightly short compared to the Westvleteren 12, But: amazing, fantastic smooth and very controlled brew.” – yespr

Algeria – Algad Golden Pils – Tessala El Merdja – Pilsener – “Bottled. Bottle is Heineken look-alike. That gives a hint about the content maybe. Pale golden colour. Frothy head, rich at first, then slowly diminishing. Aroma is loaded with minerals, a bit skunky perhaps but no major off aromas. I sensed hops and minerals in the flavour. Mouthfeel is clean and lacks off flavours. Body is low, as is the bitterness, if any at all.” – rickgordon

Russia – Stepan Razin Porter – St. Petersburg – Although this brew has all the malty caramel characteristics of a classic porter, it boasts a bright, faintly fruity finish remarkable for a porter. Long-lasting head comparable to a stout; perfect for a half-and-half. “A red-brown beer wtih no head. The aroma is sweet with a metal-acohol note – as often found in strong Eastern European beers. The flavor is dry sweet malty – the alcohol giving it the dryness, combined with notes of metal, alcohol and some rostyness.” – ungstrup

South Korea – Craftworks Jirisan Moon Bear IPA – Yongsan-gu – IPA – A full-bodied hoppy ale reminiscent of Californian brews, this one is strictly for ale lovers, with a high alcohol content, strong citrus notes, and a dry finish. “Pours a finger and half of head on a cloudy dark straw colored body. The aroma is musty pine, lemon zest and some candy corn in the background. Unique but really good. The taste is woody pine bitterness with a light malt sweetness to balance it out nicely. The texture is crisp with soft edges and moderate carbonation. Quite enjoyable.” – fatehunter

5+1 Monday Beer Readings (10) — June 2, 2014

5+1 Monday Beer Readings (10)

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Prof. says beard, beer got him canned at CSU
http://www.postandcourier.com/
A professor at Charleston Southern University is claiming he was fired over his moustached likeness adorning a Holy City beer can. Paul Roof, founder of the Holy City Beard & Moustache Society, says in a Facebook post Tuesday that he was let go from his position as an associate professor of sociology at the Christian liberal arts college in North Charleston. The photo of Paul Roof taken by Greg Anderson at the 2013 Beard and Moustache National Championships. The photo of Paul Roof taken by Greg Anderson at the 2013 Beard and Moustache National Championships. On the label of Holy City’s Chucktown Follicle Brown, Roof sports a curling, coiffured beard and white cowboy hat.

How England’s Yeast Vault Saved a Brewery After a Disastrous Flood
http://gizmodo.com/
A commercial brewery is really a factory. Raw ingredients like grain and water go in one end, flow through pipes and tanks, and beer comes out the other side. But you could gut and replace all those pipes and tanks, switch from one grain supplier to another, swap out the walls and the controllers, and the same beer would still flow from the taps, metaphorically speaking. The one thing the brewery cannot afford to lose is a finicky microbe that is the not-so-secret power behind the whole show. If you are a brewer and you plan to make a product people like, and keep making it the same way, you must maintain your yeast. The same goes for wineries, and even for distilleries — before you can distill a spirit, you have to have something fermented to start with. If you lose your yeast, you’re dead.

100 American Craft Beers Every Beer-Lover Should Drink
http://www.pastemagazine.com/
There are some things in life that people simply have to experience first hand. Riding a roller coaster. Catching a wild brook trout. Running a mile for time. Dating someone out of your league…this is what life is all about. If you’re a baseball fan, you have to see a game at Wrigley Field. If you eat food, you have to try the spicy fried chicken at Gus’s Fried Chicken in Memphis. You just have to. You haven’t lived until you’ve experienced that chicken. Likewise, if you’re a beer drinker, there are certain beers you have to drink. At least once. We’ve thought long and hard about what those quintessential beers are—the ones that everyone should try—and we’ve come up with a hearty list of 100 that define the American craft beer scene. Some of these beers would be considered the best beers in the country, if not the world. Others can hold their own, but earned a spot on this list because of the role they played in the craft beer movement. Is this a definitive list of beers everyone should try? Dear Lord, no. If you truly love beer, you should try them all. Even the bad ones. At least once. But this list will get you started.

Would You Pay $1,000 Once to Get Free Beer for Life?
http://www.citylab.com/
There is a price tag for unlimited beer for the rest of your life. It’s $1,000. In reality, the cost for that much beer is a lot more. But for a few dozen people, free beer for life is their reward for investing in a small restaurant called Northbound Smokehouse & Brewpub in a quiet southern corner of Minneapolis. Amy Johnson and her two business partners needed to raise $220,000 to secure a bank loan and fulfill their dream of opening a restaurant that served beer brewed right there at the pub. They went to investors who offered to give heavily for a voting share in the restaurant. But since the potential investors had no experience in the restaurant industry, the owners backed away.

THE SEASON OF SAISON [BEER STYLES]
http://drinkcraftbeer.com/
A few years ago, in 2012, Drink Craft Beer highlighted several Saisons in a piece called “For the Love of Saison.” Back then, American craft brewers making Saison was a somewhat new phenomenon. Today there are breweries throughout America that are trying their hands at brewing a Saison, each with a unique take on the classic Belgian style. I took the time to collect and sample some Saisons from across New England, and I am happy to report that the style is still going strong. (Editor’s Note: Everything seen here is available in Massachusetts, and several of them are available throughought New England.)

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Year of Beer Paintings – Day 150
http://realartisbetter.wordpress.com/
Today is a milestone in my Year of Beer Paintings project — Day 150! I’ve been painting a different beer every day in 2014, and haven’t missed a single day! Check out my oil paintings and prints if you are so inclined. Cheers!

5+1 Monday Beer Readings (8) — May 12, 2014

5+1 Monday Beer Readings (8)

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Craft beer trends: Sour, less boozy, collaborations
http://www.usatoday.com/
Beer lovers are far from souring on craft beer, but many brewers are turning to sour beers and other new twists to keep the growing beer category fresh. In addition to beers that may cause lips to pucker, there’s an inpouring of hoppy but lower-alcohol session brews and luxuriant, wildly inventive beers borne out of collaborations between brewers. Such experimentation is “pushing the envelope of what beer can be and finding new flavors,” says Greg Engert, beer director of Bluejacket brewery and restaurant in Washington, D.C. As overall U.S. beer consumption has declined slightly in recent years, craft beer is on the rise. Consumers spent an estimated $14.3 billion on craft beer in 2013, according to the Brewers Association, up 20% from the $11.9 billion spent in 2012.

Brouwerij Boelens
http://www.garshol.priv.no/
One of the benefits of this kind of tour is that you get to meet the people behind the various bars and breweries, and to hear them tell the story behind the company and explain how they think. At Boelens we got more of this, since we were met by the founder and brewer, Kris Boelen himself. (This is part 2 of the Scandinavian beer bloggers’ tour.)

City illustrations highlight the world’s best breweries
http://www.creativebloq.com/
All homes to famous breweries, Dublin, Sao Paulo, Bangkok and more are illustrated in gorgeous colour. If the likes of our Designer’s Guide to London are anything to go by, it’s safe to say that cities are packed full of inspiration. Here, illustrator Sam Brewster has found something in common with every one of his city illustrations – they are all home to an influential brewery.

How hot is too hot?
http://draftmag.com/
A few weeks ago, our tasting panel capped off a night of blind judging by sampling some of the hottest chili beers around. The experience was intense, and got me wondering about the audience that goes in for scorching hot beers. The three beers we popped open were Stone’s Crime and Punishment and Twisted Pine’s Ghost Face Killah. All of the judges—and myself—enjoy spicy foods (one of the judges even grows hot chilies in his backyard), but these beers were beyond our threshold. To put it into perspective, here’s what goes into making the beers:

America’s Changing Tastes Are Killing the ‘Old Man Beer’ Market
http://thedrinknation.com/
Just a few weeks ago we told you that the staggering growth of the craft beer market here in the US has forced the Brewer’s Association, the Colorado-based not-for-profit trade association that represents the majority of U.S. breweries — craft and otherwise — to relocate to larger headquarters. But now it’s looking like thirsty Americans’ growing tastes for more full-flavored libations are taking a huge bite out of the “Old Man Beer” market. USA Today reports that this major seismic shift is being felt by real sales numbers. Data provided by Beer Marketer’s Insights shows a 2.3 percent decrease, across the board, in beer consumption. That’s nearly 4.8 million barrels.

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The Brew Report App (web+iOS)
http://www.brewreport.com/
Enter a beer. We’ll tell you about it.

A Beginner’s Guide to Belgian Beer Styles — March 19, 2014

A Beginner’s Guide to Belgian Beer Styles

Belgian-BeersBelgian beer is exceptional. So many to choose from! I am not a big fan of Belgian brews – I like more English and American styles – but I have a huge respect for belgians and I love visiting their beer shops and beer bars. And it´s quite useful to be prepared because sometimes you may find a belgian beer style which is totally different and difficult to drink and appreciated.

seriouseats.com

“How can you not love a country known for its love of waffles, chocolate, French fries, and beer? Belgium is my version of Guns ‘n’ Roses’ Paradise City, where the grass is green and the beers are plenty.

And not only are the beers of Belgium vast in quantity, they’re vast in quality, diversity, and cultural importance. Every beer that we credit to the country’s name seems to have a history and character that’s independent of its neighbors on the shelf. If you’re put off by intensely bitter IPAs or bland canned lagers, the Belgian beer section at your local bottle shop may be a good place to start your love affair with beer.”

Here’s a guide to get you started