Czech Beer Blog

News from Czech beer scene plus some more stuff. Na zdravi!

Austin Beerworks are selling the 99-Pack of beer! — August 29, 2014

Austin Beerworks are selling the 99-Pack of beer!

Austin Beerworks – Peacemaker Anytime Ale from Beef and Pie Productions on Vimeo.

Campaign with Helms Workshop to reintroduce Austin Beerworks Peacemaker, renaming it “Anytime Ale.” The term clarifies when the brew is best enjoyed: specifically, any time. With a beer that’s great at any moment, you should always keep a few on hand— so a multi-pack made sense. But how many?

AnytimeAle.com
Agency: Helms Workshop
Video Production: Beef and Pie Productions
Copywriting: Mike Woolf, Christian Helms & Michael Graham
Web Development: Source Pixel Foundry

EVERYTHING YOU’VE EVER WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT BARREL-AGED BEER — April 29, 2014

EVERYTHING YOU’VE EVER WANTED TO KNOW ABOUT BARREL-AGED BEER

Barrel-Aged beers are big hit among the beer geeks. Even here, in CZ, there are some breweries trying to master this craft somehow Czech Way – they use Czech Porter beers and Czech wine barrels. So it´s always good to know about it a little bit more.

tmg-slideshow_xl

http://www.thrillist.com/
It used to be that the only age bar owners were concerned with was 21, but nowadays every serious craft beer bar has at least one brew that’s spent time in a wooden barrel before it’s old enough to drink.

To better understand how barrel-aging works, we consulted a pair of experts: the trend-setting Scottish brewers Innis & Gunn, who’ve been sneaking oak flavors into beers since 2003, and Austin, TX’s young-gun experimentalists Jester King, who’re known for using wood to make their fermentation go wild.

Why barrel age?
Innis & Gunn ages primarily to give their beer the flavor characteristics of wood, whereas Jester King uses the wood to affect the fermentation process. Hence, I&G chars their barrels heavily to allow the flavors to easily seep into the beer, while Jester King wants barrels to be as neutral as possible.

What flavors result from aging?
Oak’s most prominent flavor is vanilla, but the barrel’s previous contents have a big effect on the sloppy-second flavor characteristics. Bourbon barrels give off a toffee finish, gin has a more complex suite of botanicals, mezcal imparts more smoke and spice, and cedar spirals lend a piney aroma.

the rest of the questions and photos – thrillist.com

AT THE INTERSECTION OF BLACK METAL AND ECONOMIC SUICIDE — JESTER KING HAS THE LAST LAUGH — April 16, 2014

AT THE INTERSECTION OF BLACK METAL AND ECONOMIC SUICIDE — JESTER KING HAS THE LAST LAUGH

This is probably my most favourite small brewery in US. Crafty, with sense of humour, great desingn and labels, punk style!

jkb

http://goodbeerhunting.com/
There’s a new term in craft brewing — artisanal. You’ve seen it in cheese, woodworking, bread, and wine. But until now, it hasn’t been used to describe beer all that often. And that’s because we already had the word “craft.” But in recent years, you’ve probably heard more about the craft industry — a bit of an oxymoron — than the craft of small batch beer-making itself. That’s because craft beer is quickly becoming the new default — somewhat disregarding the craft of beer-making in any meaningful sense of the word. Most of the attention on the definition of a craft brewery is focused on size and ownership structure more than the process or artistry itself. Larger craft brewers are still making amazing beers with the same original intent, utilizing many of the same ingredients as they did when they were small. But with all the growth in the craft sector, a new niche has emerged that has little chance of ever becoming industrialized, or defined by objective metrics. And that’s artisanal brewers.
The term artisanal can be bastardized like anything else, but so far it’s most often used to describe a brewer who’s making small batches, often aged or fermented in wood, and otherwise incorporates natural elements like yeast, bacteria, and ambient temperatures into the brewing process through wild and spontaneous fermentation. It takes time, sometimes a lot, and a healthy sense of humility in the brewing process. Where industrialization, even on the level of craft, reduces beer-making down to a series of weights and measures and chemistry, the artisanal process does the same, but then releases that beer into the wild. And from that moment on, it’s a matter of balancing the brewer’s intent with nature’s will.

The whole story and beautiful photogallery from Jester King brewery here

#5 Jester King Brewery in Austin, TX — March 16, 2014

#5 Jester King Brewery in Austin, TX

Folks from Brews Travelers were in my favourite Texas brewery – Jester King in Austin. There is theirs experience. And follow them at http://brewstravelers365.com/. I am a big fan! Their mission is very interesting and exciting!

Brews Travelers 365

DSC00258

After leaving Thirsty Planet this past Saturday, we strolled right on over to Jester King just a few miles around the corner. Hidden away in far west Austin, Jester King is known for their unique methods of farmhouse brewing, which are wildly different than the approaches most other Texas breweries use. This is not to say that their style of brewing is better or worse when compared to others, just different. We were lucky enough to show up just after they released their new beer known as La Vie en Rose, “a dry, well attenuated, unspiced Farmhouse Ale refermented with the same raspberries used to make Jester King Atrial Rubicite.” After getting a taste of both the La Vie and the Atrial, we can say without a doubt that their beer is fascinatingly delightful.

View original post 374 more words