Czech Beer Blog

News from Czech beer scene plus some more stuff. Na zdravi!

1001 Beers project is here! — June 2, 2017
DC Superheroes brands beers! Awesome (fictional) labels! — October 8, 2014

DC Superheroes brands beers! Awesome (fictional) labels!

via laughingsquid

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“Florida-based graphic designer Marcelo Rizzetto has created a septet of stunning beer labels based on members of the DC Comics all-star superhero team, The Justice League (and Hanna-Barbera’s animated series Super Friends). The Justice League Brewery adult beverages varieties include Batman Dark Ale, Superman Strong Pale Lager, Green Lantern Pale Ale (green for St. Patrick’s Day), Wonder WomanPremium American Lager, The Flash Irish Red Ale, Aquaman Belgium Blond Ale, and the animated Wonder Twins Lambic Framboise.”

I love it!

artist link

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Guinness is making two new beers – and here’s what they’ll look like — September 4, 2014

Guinness is making two new beers – and here’s what they’ll look like

The Daily Edge – http://thedailyedge.thejournal.ie/

“GUINNESS HAS ANNOUNCED its entry into the growing ‘craft beer’ market with two new beers, which will be sold in Ireland from next month.

One is called Dublin Porter, and the other West Indies Porter.

Guinness say that the new brews are “inspired by” brewing methods from the 18th and 19th centuries, and the company is emphasising tradition and history in its marketing materials. Here’s what we know about them:

Dublin Porter, which has its “origins in a 1796 entry in Guinness brewers’ diaries”, is slightly less alcoholic than normal Guinness at 3.8 per cent ABV.

West Indies Porter, which the company says is based on “an 1801 diary entry for the first Guinness purposely brewed to maintain its freshness from one end of the world to another”, will be stronger than most commercial beers at 6.0 per cent ABV.”

full article

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Viva la PINTA / Kraków – opening 26.06.2014 — June 27, 2014
DAS HORN — June 25, 2014

DAS HORN

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Tired of drinking from pint glasses, flasks, or — heaven forbid — gold chalices? Grab a Das Horn. Feel like a viking conqueror without all the “I’m drinking out of an elephant tusk” guilt.

No beasts, mythical or real, were harmed in making Das Horn. Made from BPA-free plastic with a stainless steel rim, this legendary drinking vessel holds up to 24 oz. (709ml) of your favorite cold beverage.

Das Horn includes a removable neck strap and display stand if you need to put it down.

$24.99

 

Draft Beer-Flavored Jelly Belly Jelly Beans — June 24, 2014

Draft Beer-Flavored Jelly Belly Jelly Beans

via laughingsquid.com/

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“Three years in the making, Jelly Belly launches Draft Beer Jelly Belly jelly beans. The world’s first beer flavor jelly bean is inspired by hefeweizen ale with an effervescent, clean, crisp and wheaty taste. Take a behind-the-scenes look at what goes into crafting this unique bean with members of the Jelly Belly flavor team (based in California, USA) and commentary from The Beeroness, Jackie Dodd. Alcohol-free, four calories per bean, OU Kosher. Also free from fat, gluten and gelatin. Vegetarian and made in a peanut-free facility.”

The Jelly Belly Candy Company has created a new jelly bean flavor that tastes like a frosty glass full of tasty draft beer. The alcohol-free Draft Beer Jelly Belly jelly beans are available to purchase online from their official store.

5+1 Monday Beer Readings (10) — June 2, 2014

5+1 Monday Beer Readings (10)

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Prof. says beard, beer got him canned at CSU
http://www.postandcourier.com/
A professor at Charleston Southern University is claiming he was fired over his moustached likeness adorning a Holy City beer can. Paul Roof, founder of the Holy City Beard & Moustache Society, says in a Facebook post Tuesday that he was let go from his position as an associate professor of sociology at the Christian liberal arts college in North Charleston. The photo of Paul Roof taken by Greg Anderson at the 2013 Beard and Moustache National Championships. The photo of Paul Roof taken by Greg Anderson at the 2013 Beard and Moustache National Championships. On the label of Holy City’s Chucktown Follicle Brown, Roof sports a curling, coiffured beard and white cowboy hat.

How England’s Yeast Vault Saved a Brewery After a Disastrous Flood
http://gizmodo.com/
A commercial brewery is really a factory. Raw ingredients like grain and water go in one end, flow through pipes and tanks, and beer comes out the other side. But you could gut and replace all those pipes and tanks, switch from one grain supplier to another, swap out the walls and the controllers, and the same beer would still flow from the taps, metaphorically speaking. The one thing the brewery cannot afford to lose is a finicky microbe that is the not-so-secret power behind the whole show. If you are a brewer and you plan to make a product people like, and keep making it the same way, you must maintain your yeast. The same goes for wineries, and even for distilleries — before you can distill a spirit, you have to have something fermented to start with. If you lose your yeast, you’re dead.

100 American Craft Beers Every Beer-Lover Should Drink
http://www.pastemagazine.com/
There are some things in life that people simply have to experience first hand. Riding a roller coaster. Catching a wild brook trout. Running a mile for time. Dating someone out of your league…this is what life is all about. If you’re a baseball fan, you have to see a game at Wrigley Field. If you eat food, you have to try the spicy fried chicken at Gus’s Fried Chicken in Memphis. You just have to. You haven’t lived until you’ve experienced that chicken. Likewise, if you’re a beer drinker, there are certain beers you have to drink. At least once. We’ve thought long and hard about what those quintessential beers are—the ones that everyone should try—and we’ve come up with a hearty list of 100 that define the American craft beer scene. Some of these beers would be considered the best beers in the country, if not the world. Others can hold their own, but earned a spot on this list because of the role they played in the craft beer movement. Is this a definitive list of beers everyone should try? Dear Lord, no. If you truly love beer, you should try them all. Even the bad ones. At least once. But this list will get you started.

Would You Pay $1,000 Once to Get Free Beer for Life?
http://www.citylab.com/
There is a price tag for unlimited beer for the rest of your life. It’s $1,000. In reality, the cost for that much beer is a lot more. But for a few dozen people, free beer for life is their reward for investing in a small restaurant called Northbound Smokehouse & Brewpub in a quiet southern corner of Minneapolis. Amy Johnson and her two business partners needed to raise $220,000 to secure a bank loan and fulfill their dream of opening a restaurant that served beer brewed right there at the pub. They went to investors who offered to give heavily for a voting share in the restaurant. But since the potential investors had no experience in the restaurant industry, the owners backed away.

THE SEASON OF SAISON [BEER STYLES]
http://drinkcraftbeer.com/
A few years ago, in 2012, Drink Craft Beer highlighted several Saisons in a piece called “For the Love of Saison.” Back then, American craft brewers making Saison was a somewhat new phenomenon. Today there are breweries throughout America that are trying their hands at brewing a Saison, each with a unique take on the classic Belgian style. I took the time to collect and sample some Saisons from across New England, and I am happy to report that the style is still going strong. (Editor’s Note: Everything seen here is available in Massachusetts, and several of them are available throughought New England.)

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Year of Beer Paintings – Day 150
http://realartisbetter.wordpress.com/
Today is a milestone in my Year of Beer Paintings project — Day 150! I’ve been painting a different beer every day in 2014, and haven’t missed a single day! Check out my oil paintings and prints if you are so inclined. Cheers!

5+1 Monday Beer Readings (9) — May 26, 2014

5+1 Monday Beer Readings (9)

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NEW SEASON, NEW BEERS: SIX GREAT CHOICES FOR SUMMER
http://gearpatrol.com/
Chinese medicine recommends “drinking with the seasons” — that is, consuming scented tea in the spring, green tea in the summer, oolong tea in the fall and black tea in the winter, so that the drink complements the mood and temperature of the season. These are wise words, proven unequivocally by another of our favorite beverages: beer. In the winter, for example, a roasty, toasty stout complements a cold evening beside a fire, but in the summer, the thought of consuming a 14 percent ABV Russian imperial ruins the appetite for a drink entirely. No, as the weather turns warmer we thirst for something whiter, lighter, a bit more refreshing. Fragrant farmhouse ales (also called “saisons”) fit the bill, as do floral pale ales and low ABV session IPAs. ‘Tis the season for lazy Saturdays, day hikes and easy drinking. Put some fire to that charcoal and crack open a cold one — one of these would be fine.

Everything Science Knows About Hangovers—And How to Cure Them
http://www.wired.com/
Good morning, sunshine! You are so screwed. The light coming in through the window is so … there. You’d kill for a glass of water but die if it came with food. Your guts are in full rebellion; whatever happens next is going to happen in the bathroom. You have at least a couple of the following symptoms: headache, malaise, diarrhea, loss of appetite, fatigue, nausea, the shakes. You might also be dehydrated and feel generally slow—a little stupider, a little less coordinated. You, my friend, have a hangover. And you can take heart in the fact that you’re not alone. Some 77 percent of all drinkers report suffering from them. (The scientific term for the other 23 percent is “jerks.”) But here’s the amazing part: The underlying cause of your suffering remains a mystery. “What causes a hangover? Nobody really knows,” says epidemiologist Jonathan Howland. “And what can you do about it? Nobody knows.”

Why beer is good for your health
http://mickomalleys.com.au/
Among different types of alcoholic drinks, wine has always been given special attention for offering health benefits. But, studies show that regular but moderate intake of beer can also prove beneficial for both men and women, especially if one is facing age related health conditions. It is found that those who consume beer in moderate degree are 30 to 35% less likely to suffer heart problems compared to those who don’t. Moderate consumption of alcohol such as beer boosts the level of lipoprotein or HDL in body. Reasons why you can drink beer…..

The 11 Types of Bar and How to Navigate Them
https://medium.com
In my extensive studies in bar culture, I have determined that there are 11 specific kinds of bar in the world. I call them the 11 Barchetypes. And it’s time for me to tell you about them.

The Science Behind Beer Foam
http://www.craftbeer.com/
Whether you refer to it as foam, head, kräusen or the junk on top of your beer—love it or hate it—the foam that develops on top of most craft beers is impossible to ignore. But what is it, exactly? How can foam differ from glass to glass and beer to beer? Why is your beer foamy, but not the one served to the person sitting next to you? Behind beer foam’s mysterious curtain there is actually a lot of science!

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Summer of beer: Five festivals to look forward to
http://www.washingtonpost.com/
Summer festival season is about to begin, and I’m not talking about music – I’m talking about beer. Five big events featuring dozens of craft breweries are coming to the Washington area over the next two months, and that’s before we get to the bacchanalia that is D.C. Beer Week in August. Which one(s) should you spend your hard-earned money on? To help wade through the relative merits of five upcoming events, I’ve put together this planning calendar.

5+1 Monday Beer Readings (8) — May 19, 2014

5+1 Monday Beer Readings (8)

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Doing my bit for the Surrey hop-growing industry
http://zythophile.wordpress.com/

I’ve been invited on plenty of brewery visits over the years, but never before has the invite come with the request: “Please bring wellies and a spade.” This, however, was a field trip in a considerably more literal sense than normal: to the two and a half-acre field right opposite the Hogs Back brewery in Tongham, just outside Farnham in Surrey, to witness – and take part in – a historic event: the first planting of the Farnham White Bine hop variety in its native soil since the last bines were grubbed up 85 years ago. This is not just, however, a footnote in Farming Today magazine: this is, according to Hogs Back’s chairman, Rupert Thompson, an important step towards increasing the “localism” aspect of the brewery’s products. Once the new hop ground (the proper Surrey name for what elsewhere are called hop gardens or hop yards) are producing a healthy crop, those hops can then be used to flavour the beer being brewed just yards away: Surrey’s own hop variety, grown in Surrey, to produce Surrey beers.

 

How India pale ale conquered the world
http://www.economist.com/

INDIA pale ale (IPA) had a good claim to be the first global beer, before lager took a grip on the world’s tipplers. Now IPA, an amber, hop-laden brew, high in alcohol, is regaining its global footprint. Arguments rage about the origins and history of IPA. Britain’s territories on the Indian subcontinent were generally too hot for brewing. So a couple of hundred years ago, to keep army officers and officials of the East India Company away from the fearsome local firewater, beer was exported from Britain to take its place. Whether a beer already existed that had the characteristics of IPA or whether it was developed for the purpose is a matter of heated debate among beer historians. What is clear is that hops, which act as a preservative as well as a flavouring, combined with a hefty dose of alcohol for added robustness, ensured that the beer survived the long sea journey to India. Indeed, the months jiggling in a barrel onboard seemed only to improve the flavour. The style caught on at home, as the brew seeped onto the domestic market.

 

How We Brewed the Beer of the Future
http://gizmodo.com/

It’s time for the final chapter in the story of our collaboration with Sixpoint to make Hop Tech 431, the beer of the future. First, we found an experimental hop and we designed a brand-new recipe, then we trained a swarm of autonomous robots to do the brewing. Just kidding. Instead, we brewed it the old-school way—by hand—on Sixpoint’s 15-barrel system in Red Hook, Brooklyn. Gizmodo joined brewers Danny Bruckert and Keir Hamilton to take our turn with the mash paddle (which subsequently broke, in a—we claim—entirely unrelated incident).

 

Stone Brewery Evacuated Due To Wild Fires In San Marcos, CA
http://mybeerbuzz.blogspot.cz/

Photos and tweets courtesy of Stone: We are officially evacuating our home base. Thanks to everyone for expressing their care and concern. This is the view from the roof of our brewery. Wishing best to friends throughout San Diego County!!! #sanmarcosfire

 

Reports of the Craft Beer Bubble Have Been Greatly Exaggerated
http://www.inebriateinquirer.com/

If you’ve spent any time talking to people in the craft beer community, you’ve heard them bring the subject around to an ominous prospect for the industry: a bubble. The argument goes that an industry with such short pedigree and such rapid growth will invariably collapse under the weight of its own success, resulting in bankrupt businesses, lost jobs, and empty glassware. But is the bubble real? Or is it just a specter brought about by nervous beer-drinkers? First, let’s take a look at the facts.

 

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10 FUNNIEST BREWERY ‘UNDER 21′ REDIRECT PAGES
http://guyism.com/

The idiots that be determined that people under 21 years old shouldn’t be allowed to look at brewery websites because they might get secondhand wasted. Many breweries just have a “tough shit” pop up or redirect to Google. But some take it upon themselves to ease the defeat with entertainment.

5+1 Monday Beer Readings (8) — May 12, 2014

5+1 Monday Beer Readings (8)

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Craft beer trends: Sour, less boozy, collaborations
http://www.usatoday.com/
Beer lovers are far from souring on craft beer, but many brewers are turning to sour beers and other new twists to keep the growing beer category fresh. In addition to beers that may cause lips to pucker, there’s an inpouring of hoppy but lower-alcohol session brews and luxuriant, wildly inventive beers borne out of collaborations between brewers. Such experimentation is “pushing the envelope of what beer can be and finding new flavors,” says Greg Engert, beer director of Bluejacket brewery and restaurant in Washington, D.C. As overall U.S. beer consumption has declined slightly in recent years, craft beer is on the rise. Consumers spent an estimated $14.3 billion on craft beer in 2013, according to the Brewers Association, up 20% from the $11.9 billion spent in 2012.

Brouwerij Boelens
http://www.garshol.priv.no/
One of the benefits of this kind of tour is that you get to meet the people behind the various bars and breweries, and to hear them tell the story behind the company and explain how they think. At Boelens we got more of this, since we were met by the founder and brewer, Kris Boelen himself. (This is part 2 of the Scandinavian beer bloggers’ tour.)

City illustrations highlight the world’s best breweries
http://www.creativebloq.com/
All homes to famous breweries, Dublin, Sao Paulo, Bangkok and more are illustrated in gorgeous colour. If the likes of our Designer’s Guide to London are anything to go by, it’s safe to say that cities are packed full of inspiration. Here, illustrator Sam Brewster has found something in common with every one of his city illustrations – they are all home to an influential brewery.

How hot is too hot?
http://draftmag.com/
A few weeks ago, our tasting panel capped off a night of blind judging by sampling some of the hottest chili beers around. The experience was intense, and got me wondering about the audience that goes in for scorching hot beers. The three beers we popped open were Stone’s Crime and Punishment and Twisted Pine’s Ghost Face Killah. All of the judges—and myself—enjoy spicy foods (one of the judges even grows hot chilies in his backyard), but these beers were beyond our threshold. To put it into perspective, here’s what goes into making the beers:

America’s Changing Tastes Are Killing the ‘Old Man Beer’ Market
http://thedrinknation.com/
Just a few weeks ago we told you that the staggering growth of the craft beer market here in the US has forced the Brewer’s Association, the Colorado-based not-for-profit trade association that represents the majority of U.S. breweries — craft and otherwise — to relocate to larger headquarters. But now it’s looking like thirsty Americans’ growing tastes for more full-flavored libations are taking a huge bite out of the “Old Man Beer” market. USA Today reports that this major seismic shift is being felt by real sales numbers. Data provided by Beer Marketer’s Insights shows a 2.3 percent decrease, across the board, in beer consumption. That’s nearly 4.8 million barrels.

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The Brew Report App (web+iOS)
http://www.brewreport.com/
Enter a beer. We’ll tell you about it.